12 Parent Outreach Programs Spreading Joy This Holiday Season

The holidays are intended to bring peace and joy to all. Hopefully, they give us time away from work to be with loved ones and reflect on what has been a challenging and transformative year. Unfortunately, this peace may not come easy for many families, especially in 2020. Whether it’s putting food on the table or gifts under the tree, disciplining a rambunctious child, caring for an elderly family member or one with special needs, or working multiple jobs, the demands of daily life can seem endless. For these families, the holidays instead can be overwhelming and the expectations that surround it can weigh heavy. We want to share a list from Colorado Parent highlighting many incredible organizations in the Colorado community that are working to bring struggling families the support they need.

 

Whether you need the help or have a little extra to give this season, learn more from the list below about how to volunteer, seek help, or become better acquainted with your lovely neighbors in a powerful way now and all year long.

 

This is a program born from a partnership between the Tennyson Center, a treatment center for kids facing critical circumstances, and Foster Together, a family support and stabilization network. In conjunction with professionals and clinicians that specialize in family trauma and support, the team up has jumpstarted a neighbor training program. Organized exchanges of meals, friendly phone calls, and fun games are just some of the ways neighbors can give and receive support without any stigmas or awkwardness. Neighbors of diverse backgrounds can come together in mutual support during an important time of year.

 

With a 24-hour hotline, you can call 844-493-8255 or text TALK to 38255, to reach professionals or professionally-trained peers to develop a plan of action that leads to support for substance abuse as well as mental and emotional health. Services can be translated in more than 200 languages.

 

Available until June, this short-term program, stemming from a partnership between AllHealth Network and the Colorado Department of Public Health and Environment, focuses on the complications that have emerged specifically from the COVID-19 pandemic. Their services include group and individual counseling, recovery options and connections to other helpful agencies.

 

As an alternative to hospitalization, this organization offers at-risk youth, from the ages of 5 to 18, a network of support. Trauma-informed nurses, teachers, and social workers come together to provide treatment programs for problems with substance abuse and mental health.

 

Pairing in home visits for children with their support group counseling for parents called Circle of Parents, the Shiloh House conducts a Parents as Teachers Program. The goal is to prevent intervention by the Department of Human Services. From six campuses, they offer a wide range of resources.

 

Serving American Indians and Alaska Natives, the DIFRC is culturally sensitive in its support of these particular groups, ones that often feel misunderstood when seeking help from other similar organizations serving the general population. With over 100 tribes represented in the metro area, they offer grocery cards, job loss support, and utility or rent assistance, problems especially prevalent in these groups since the pandemic.

 

Centered on the same marginalized groups as above, they offer culturally-specific therapy and education regarding behavior, health care, and substance use. Private counseling is available to children aged 8 and above.

 

Offering an array of services and acting as a hub for several other organizations, the FFRC specializes in providing support and aide to black members of the Denver community. The Center offers cooking classes, nutritional information, and general parenting education.

 

Working in conjunction with several local churches, schools, and businesses in both the private and public sector, this almost 40-year-old organization primarily serves the Latin community of Denver Metro. Founded by Chicano activists in response to the Chicano civil rights movement, it has since expanded to peoples of all ethnicities, ages, and genders that need help. Their programs, funded by donation, include a clothing bank for children, food distribution, and COVID-19 situation mitigation, stress management and counseling.

 

Online services range from mutual parent mentorship to therapy to training. Programs are offered in both English and Spanish.

 

Children with special needs receive individualized care from a variety of health and educational professionals including nurses, social workers, occupational therapists, and creative arts therapists. These methods are often brought into home life via supplemental caregiver training.

 

12. Right Next Door!
The love begins at home and in your own surrounding neighborhood. Please offer specific help if you are able, or have the courage to ask for help if you need it. Corken + Company is privileged to have a steadfast and diverse community of clients and partners. We are always here to help connect that community and be a resource, in real estate and beyond.

 

Happy Holidays! May your days be merry and bright! 

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